Film scores

Soundtrack review: Moth (Gergő Elekes -2016)

moth
If you enjoy dark ambient music and if you are addicted to the moody piano like I am, this will be a score you won’t forget.

“Moth” is a 2016 Hungarian/ US/ UK found footage horror feature film directed by Gergő Elekes & József Gallai. An enthusiastic lecturer and her student travel to Europe to go after the mythology of the Mothman, but they soon have to fight for survival. I first met Gergő Elekes when he wrote the stunning score for “Perihelion” last year. Now he’s back also as a director with this one and I couldn’t wait to hear the music.

From the first moments I realize this is a whole new side of the composer I will be discovering. I am sucked into an uncomfortable industrial atmosphere through an opening cue, “Pyralidae”, which is sharp on all its sides and I have to be careful when handling it. The music feels like broken glass and nothing good can come out of it. Since the composer also directed the movie I can imagine this is how “Moth” feels: hopeless and dangerous.

The second cue is even better. It’s like listening to one of the deepest and most melodic Nine Inch Nails instrumental tracks. I hear the echo of the piano the composer enjoys so much, first far away and menacing, then closer and more intimate and I am in love with this 80 seconds long piece. Because of the aforementioned band and the years I spend listening to their music and studying them, “Moth” goes straight to the dark side of my heart. “Psychidae” remind me of “The fragile” or “The girl with the dragon tattoo”. I don’t know if Gergő is a fan of Trent Reznor but he wrote a score that resonates with the deepest and most hidden places inside me. This cue is what I call a ghost because of how it attracts and haunts me; it’s the kind of track I want to play on repeat until I have drifted far away from the real world.

“Depressariidae” is even better. I am just stunned by this score. I don’t know how it will affect the rest of you but for me this is the core of the instrumental music I like. This atmospheric bliss, this gray and empty dreamland is my sanctuary and I just wish this score was longer than 17 minutes. Even when the dream is over and the music gets louder and more rock oriented in “Tortricidae” it still stays close to my kind of sound. The end, “Prodoxidae” is also the most beautiful cue on this score and one of the best I’ve heard so far in 2016. The regret of the album being so short is even more poignant when the choral part begins. This final theme is beautiful and melodic and you might find it pop up in your head after you finished listening to “Moth”.

If you enjoy dark ambient music and if you are addicted to the moody piano like I am, this will be a score you won’t forget. Prepare to be touched by a composition that goes very deep and might bring some memories to the surface… I will keep it very close and I’m sure I’ll listen to it quite often from now on.

Cue rating: 97 / 100

Total minutes of excellence: 15 / 18

Album excellence: 81%

Highlights:

Nepticulidae

Psychidae

Depressariidae

Tortricidae

Prodoxidae

About the author

Mihnea Manduteanu

I have been listening to film music for 25 years and writing about it since 2014. I've written over 1000 reviews and I can't imagine myself doing anything else. I am also a member of IFMCA (International Film Music Critics Association).

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